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COLLEGE 



AEW3L 



Vol. 3. No. 18. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY IT, 1904. 



Price, 5 Cents 



The Holyokc Convention. 

The annual New England convention of 
Young Women's Christian Associations 
was held this year at Holyoke, February 
5-7. Wellesley's representation was larger 
than that of any other college or city asso- 
ciation and from the time that the forty- 
four Wellesley delegates reached the Holy- 
oke station until they turned toward home 
again on Monday evening, everything 
combined to make their visit a happy one. 
Homes in every part of the city were 
thrown open to delegates: on Friday even- 
ing the Holyoke City Association wel- 
comed all visitors to a banquet. 

The first evening service was held in the 
chapel at Mt. Holyoke College, with Presi- 
dent Wooley presiding. The music wa s 
by the college choir, a white-robed chorus 
of oxer a hundred girls. The address of 
the evening, by Dr. Moore of Harvard, was 
most inspiring. Saturday morning came 
the conferences of city workers and of 
student workers. At the Student confer- 
ence very interesting reports were heard 
from thirteen women's college associations, 
from the "baby" associations struggling 
to keep alive to the larger ones with their 
wider problems. Among the prominent 
speakers were President Wooley, who gave 
an address on Saturday afternoon; Miss 
S Bridges who talked of the oppor- 
tunity of the College Girl for work in 
city associations; Mrs. Ei'lic Price Gladding 
and Miss Conde, both of whom are so well 
known to Wellesley. It is good news to 
us all that Miss Conde is to be the 
guest of our own Association from 
March 17 to March _>r. We shall be 
glad indeed to see her, partly because 
she understands Association work so well, 
but even more because she is a woman 
who always brings a message which will 
appeal to girls Sunday, which was the 
last day of the conference, was the best day 
of all, with a short devotional meeting 
before the church service, and an evening 
meeting ending in a farewell service. 

On Monday most of the Wellesley dele- 
gation visited Mt. Holyoke and Smith 
Colleges where they were royalty enter- 
tained by members of the Christian Asso- 
ciations of those colleges. 



Dr. van Dyke's Reading. 

On Saturday afternoon, February 13, 
in College Hall Chapel, Dr. Henry van 
Dyke gave a very delightful author's 
reading, which was eagerly attended by 
members of the College and by a number 
of guests. It is a fine thing, indeed, to 
know and to understand an author through 
his work, but it is a far finer thing to know 
the real man, himself, and to get a clearer 
insight into the thoughts of the author by 
hearing his own interpretation of parts of 
his work. The College has had the rare 
good fortune this year to listen to a num- 
ber of distinguished authors, Mr. Yeats, 
Mr llopkinson Smith, and Dr. van Dyke, 
and we should feel proud that we 
can add three such names to the list of 
great men whom we have seen and heard. 

As President Hazard said in presenting 
Dr. van Dyke, the reader needed no intro- 
duction to the members of the College; he 
was already known to them in his capacity 
as a preacher, and it was but an added 
pleasure to know him as one of the masters 
of the English language. There are few 
of us, who do not also know the preach- 
er and the master in his delightful capacity 
as a genuine sportsman and who have not 
shared with him the joys of the lover of the 
out-of-doors life in "Fisherman's Luck" 
and "Little Rivers." To us "The Ruling 
Passion" and "The Blue Flower" brought 
a message of life in its keener sense of living, 
and through them we felt speak the man 
who knew the deeper secrets of life, who. 
himself, had lived and worked and suffered. 

For the reading on Saturday afternoon, 
Dr. van Dyke limited himself to verse 
only, remarking rather humorously at the 
beginning, that an author's reading was in 
one sense a compensation to the author in 
that he knew that some of his words would 
be read if he had to read them himself. 
In choosing verse for his reading, Dr. van 
Dyke gave his listeners the opportunity of 
hearing some of his work which was not so 
well known and of hearing the verse read 
by the one who could give to it the finest 
interpretation. For the first selection, 
the reader chose one from a group of bird 
poems, "The Song Sparrow," a delicate 



little piece of verse, full of music and nature 
spirit. In the group of sonnets, "World," 
"Life," "Love," the "Child in the Gar- 
den," and "Sorrow," the poet strikes a 
deeper tone, presenting in exquisite verse, 
with thoughtful and sympathetic touch, 
some of the minor aspects of life. The 
verses on music were an attempt, the author 
said, to put into words some of the personal 
feeling we have toward music, to bring 
out the relation of that "most wonderful, 
most mystic, most spiritual of the arts," 
to us in our busy life. The "Ode to Mu- 
sic" had a distinct charm in thought and 
in the music of the lines; then followed a 
group of songs, the "Sleep Song," the 
Hunting Song," which was irresistible 
in its swing and cadence, the " Dance 
Song" and a concluding appreciation of 
music in its message to life. It was all 
too short, as good things always are; the 
only regret of those who listened to the 
reading was that there was not more. 



Vesper Service, February 14th. 

The service last Sunday evening was a 
fitting termination to our annual Day of 
Prayer. Of great historical interest was 
"The Bidding Prayer," which. President 
Hazard explained, is a prayer which has 
been used for many years in the English 
universities. Slightly changed and adapt- 
ed for our country and our College, it was 
very impressive in its petitions for all in 
authority, and in the earnestness with 
which it was offered. The music was 
especially good with solos by Miss Wheeler, 
Miss McClure and Miss Nevin. 

SERVICE LIST. 

Service Prelude. 

Processional. 

Invocation. 

Hymn (459). 

Service Anthem: "The Strain Upraise" 

Sir Arthur Sullivan 
Psalm 56. 
Scripture. 
The Bidding Prayer. 

Organ: Largo. Op. 2, No. 2 Beethoven 

Choir: "Saviour, Breathe an Evening 

Blessing" H. C. M. 

Organ: Meditation D'Evry 

Prayers. 
Recessional. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Coll ege IR ews. 

Press of N. A. Lindscv A> Co.. Boston. 

Published weekly. Subscription price, 75 cents 
a year to resident subscribers; $1.00 per year to 
non-resident subscribers. 

All business correspondence should be ad- 
dressed to ANNIE V. LUFF, Business Manager 
College News. 

All subscriptions should be sent to Cora L. 
Butler. ___ 

Editor-in-Chief, Carolyn P. Nelson, 1905 

Associate Editor. Helen R. Norton. 1905 

Literary Editors, 

Elisabeth Hardman, 1905 Ellen Manchester, 1905 

Jessie Gidley, 1906 

Alumnae Editor, Roxana H. Vivian 94 

Managing Editors 

Annie V. Luff, 1904 

Cora L. Butler, 1904 Edith Fox, 1904 



••Entered as second class matter November 12, 
190:?, at the post office at Welk-.-lt y. Mas*., under 
the Act of Congress, March 3. 1879. 



In a recent editorial in the Independent, 
which comments rather unfavorably upon 
present methods of teaching English in our 
schools and colleges, a suggestion is made 
in regard to the value of translation, as an 
exercise to increase one's command of one's 
own language. To those of us who have 
stumbled, or have been sadly aware of the 
stumblings of others, through originally 
beautiful passages of Greek, or Latin, or 
German, the thought comes with a greater 
or less degree of interest. 

Those who are most deeply concerned 
for our welfare, while we are frantically 
striving for knowledge, have repeatedly 
warned us against mistaking words for 
ideas. We ourselves, in our sober mo- 
ments, realize the need of the warning. 
We remember that we have sometimes 
gone to an examination with our memo- 
ries actively engaged in reproducing for the 
mind's eye certain paragraphs or sections 
on certain pages of our text-books We 
were doing our best to disobey the spirit of 
the law which says "Xo books or papers 
are to be taken to examination rooms.' 
It is just so, in many cases, when we are 
translating in class. We try so hard to be 
literally correct; to remember the diction- 



It's a F OWNES' 

That's all you 
need to know about 
a glove 



SPECTACLES 

»«* EYEGLASSES. 



In our enlarged quarters we are better pre- 
pared than ever to furnish you with the very- 
best Optical Goods, at our usual moderate 
prices. We solicit a comparison of our goods 
and prices. 



Pinkham & Smith, 

The Back Bay Opticians, 
288 Boylston Street, Boston. 



ary definitions and how the words look, 
that our performance is too often mechan- 
ical and uninteresting. Vet as our 
teachers have told us. and as we continue 
to forget, we do not study Latin and Ger- 
man just to know Latin and German. 
We study them partly for their value in 
our English, a value which the literal 
translator underestimates or disregards 

The editor believes that more written 
translations, both of prose and of verse, 
should be required of English students. 
Some of us remember such exen 
among the most valuable of our training, 
nor should we have been surprised to find 
them so. since we know that many authors 
began their career as translators of the 
works of others, thus gaining fluency of 
expression for their own original and later 
work. 

If the editor has not been misinformed, 
an annual prize has been offered at Har- 
vard for the best metrical translation of 
an ode of Horace. Why should we not 
occasionally make competitive written 
translations of stork or poems, 

from the ancient or modern languages 
which we are study k 




Underwood's Deviled Ham 

if you have it on hand, will help greatly 
to entertain the unexpected guest. 

It's an old-fashioned product — made 
honestly and pure of HAM and pure 
spices — nothing else. 

All first class dealers sell it. 

Look on the can for the little red devil. 
Wm. Underwood Co., Boston, Mass. 



BOSTON REPRESENTATIVE 

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Helts, Stocks, 

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MISS McCHARLES, 

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GOWNS FOR COLLEGE WEAR. 

Reasonable Prices. 



PHOTOS 

In Platinum. Carbon, Carbonette. Photog- 
rapher to Wellesley, '04, '05 and '03. 

THE HEARN STUDIO, 

C W- Hearn, 349 Boylston St , Boston. 
Personal attention to all sittings. 



DOWSLEY & LAFFEE, 
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168 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 
Discount to Wellesley Students and Faculty. 



SAVES HOSIERY 



NEVER SLIPS, TEARS 
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HOSE 
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If your Dealer does not sell you this 
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Every Clasp has the name Sgnj^ 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR. 



February 17. 7.30 P. M . mid-week prayer meeting of the Chris- 
tian Association. 

nary 20, 7.30 P. M.. first concert of the Glee and Mandolin 

Clul 
February 21. 11.00 A. M . services in Houghton Memorial 

Chapel. Sermon by Rev. S. D. McConnell, D. D . of All 

Souls' Church. New York City. 

7 P. M Vespers. Memorial service for Henry Fowle Du. 

rant. founder of the College Address by Rev. Alexander 

McKenzie, D. D.. of Cambridge. 
Februray 22. Washington's Birthday. 

P. M.. reception given by The Agora. 

md concert of the Glee and Mandolin Clubs. 



COLLEGE NOTES. 



Photographs showing the work done by the Indoor Meet Class 
have been taken and will be sent to the St. Louis Exposition, with 
photographs of the 1902 class crew. The photographs represent 
groups of students in various gymnastic positions in both floor 
and apparatus work. A copy of new and very carefully tabu- 
lated compiled by the Department of Physical Train- 
sent to the Exposition. These statistics are of 
.nd will soon be posted and circulated in the Col- 

The Department of Physical Training will introduce in the 
spring season, novice classes in all land sports, with an instructor 
for each sport. These will be All Comers' Classes." and the 
work will be recreative, separate from the Athletic Association 
organization. 

Bv the generosity of President Hazard inTsupp^menting a 
hind by the Physics Department. Professor Whiting 

has this week been able to purchase an electric lantern primar- 
ily for the projection of pictures, at a cost of $200.00. An al- 
ternating current motor and small direct current dynamo placed 
in the loft on the fifth floor, furnishes the proper current to run 
this lantern either in the P. L. R. or the Chapel. It is hoped 
another vear to add to this lantern the parts necessary for dis- 
solving vu 

The Senior-Sophomore division of the Debating Club met in 
Lecture Room 1. Thursday evening. February 11. and debated 
on the question. Resolved: That the study of Biblical History 
should not be compulsory in Wellesley Colic _ 

Miss Baker. 1904. and M'ss Hibbard ntertained the 

- Club at the Tau Zeta Epsilon House. Friday evening. 

nary 12 Stories by Miss Smith. 1904. Miss Haulenbeek, 

md Miss Hibbard. were read and discus 
turday evening, February it,, a cotillion was given at the 
Barn by about fifty Juniors for as many Freshmen. 

The Faculty Science Club met Tuesday evening. February 16. 
at the Whitin Observatory. The subject for the evening was 
" The Work of Herbert Spencer." 

The attention of all students is called especially to the service 
to be held in memory of Mr Durant next Sunday evening. Feb- 
ruary 2 1 . 

Thursday evening, February 1 1 . a farce. A Wonderful Cure." 
was sfiven at Denison House in Boston by some of the Sopho- 
mores. The parts were taken by Misses Elizabeth Everett. 
Elizabeth Goddard. Julia Long and Dorothy Tryon. Several 
delightful solos by Miss Ora Williams added to the evening's 
entertainment. 

Miss Charlotte Acker of the Class of 1SS6 of Vassar. spent 
Sunday. February 7. at Wellesley. 

William Connor, father of Elizabeth Connor, 1906. died Tues- 
day. February 9. in Des Moines. Iowa. 

Mrs Cash and Miss Waite were at home in the parlors of Wood 
Wednesday afternoon. February 10. from four to - 

On Wednesday afternoon. Miss Dorothy Trvon. iqo6. and 
M ; ss Julia Long, 1906. gave a small tea in Freeman for Mrs 
Botherly. 1SS0. and Miss Claire Conklin. 1902. 

On Friday evening. February 12. Miss Theodora Scr. 
1906. and Miss Alice Carroll, 1906, entertained the Southern 
Club in Stone Hall. 

Miss Emily Bradley, formerly of 1905, is visiting in Welleslev 
and vicinity. 

Miss Florence Russell, 1903, and Miss Christabel Cannon, 
spent Sunday. February 14. at the Col: 

Miss Ruth Xeely. 1907, dislocated her knee while visiting in 
Spencer. Massachusetts, and will be unable to return to College 
for several da; 

Mrs. Mehitabel Adams Xewhall. mother of Eliza Xewhall, 
1905, died Monday, February S, in Lynn. Mass. 



1903. 



Shoes for College Girls. 

The Finest Line of $3.00 and $3.50 
Boots in Boston. Plain and Fancy 
Slippers Suitable for all occasions. 

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144 Tremont Street, Boston. 

ROSS' ORCHESTRA, 



Studio Building, Room 3}£, 

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TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS, 
Residence, 144-5 Brighton (all times*, 
Office, 25029 Main (Studio Bldg. 1.30-4. P.M. 



FINEST Passenger Train service over 
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A. S. HANSON, 

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LUNCHEON. 

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Everything we serve in our Dining Room is the choicest and best 
that can be bought, regardless ot price. 

SHREVE, CRUMP & LOW CO. 

JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS, BOSTON 

FINE STATIONERY. UMBRELLAS, PARASOLS. 
WEDDING GIFTS. 
OFFICIAL MAKERS OF THE WELLESLEY SEAL PINS. 
FINE JEWELRY REPAIRING. 

Every (Requisite for a 

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at 

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55 to 61 Summer Street, 

( Only one block from Washington St.) 




COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS. 



Last spring an opportunity was given to us as Wellesley stu- 
dents to show our sympathy in the work which is being done by 
the college for girls in Spain. We responded gladly and prompt- 
ly by joining the National Institute League and by sending 
shortly after our yearly payment. But this was merely a small 
beginning. In joining the League we not only expressed our 
interest in the work, but we also signified our desire to be iden- 
tified with it, and a firm belief in its success. Our confidence has 
been more than justified, for since then the work has been 
steadily growing. Last fall a dwelling house in Madrid was 
renovated and fitted up for a school. This is used for classes, 
and the students live in a house near by. But these houses are 
entirely inadequate and fail to meet the growing needs of the 
school, which can now accommodate only fifty students. In 
view of this fact an earnest attempt is now being made to raise 
$20,000 towards building a College Hall. Several of our large 
colleges have realized their responsibility, and have contributed 
generously to this work. The Freshman class of Mt. Holyoke 
has recently pledged 87 5. Shall not this great need and the 
generosity of our sister colleges inspire us to do all we can? An 
opportunity will shortly be given to every one to share in this 
work — will you not do your part? E. H. M., 1905. 

II. 

That which we have to bring is merely an old-fashioned plea 
for sweet charitv. or. if you like, a new fashioned plea for sweet- 
ness and light in making up our estimates of people and things, — 
and especially people: to know people better before we judge 
them and always to be more disposed to know them. Col- 
lege estimates are peculiarly based on circumstantial evidence, 
and they ought to be the result of sane and sweet study. Look, 
for instance, at the "grind" a little more closely — may she not 
be sometimes the girl who with many physical limitations has 
sound, good sense enough to heed them? It would be a great 
loss surely to give up good-night chats with a half dozen or so of 
one's specials. Of course we wouldn't forego them; and yet, if 
any one should happen to care about doing good work, a long 
night's rest is an item in that sum. Then there is the "frivolous' ' 
girl, and the "strong" girl, and the "erratic" girl, and the girl 
who "lacks moral earnestness." And so on, on. We underrate 
and we overrate. We live in a community of insistent classifica- 
tion; and herein lies the harm. Few people will be classified 
reasonably, in all respects, and we owe it to them and to our- 
selves to preserve each as an individual. When we let one un- 
welcome feattire establish a type in our minds, we are assailing 
the beauty of college life and striking at the very heart of fellow- 
ship. E. E. L., 1905. 

III. 

Miss Sherwood's charming little operetta, "The Goose Girl." 
given by Boston children for the benefit of the Free Home for 
Consumptives, came off last week. It is the prettiest kind of a 
dramatization of a fairy tale, with a prince and princess, a fairy 
godmother who hears voices, and a wicked waiting-maid whose 
misdeeds bring about all the trouble. It is most decidedly a 
children's play; the children who heard it enjoying it as much as 
the little ones who acted in it. The children were all amateurs, 
and their complete lack of self-consciousness and sophistication, 
made the whole presentation most delightful. Some of them 
showed decided talent, taking their parts with much spirit and 
grace. The play is simple and naive; the little goose herd uncon- 
cernedly takes off his shoes and stockings to show the little prin- 
cess, who is almost " downright stupid," as he informs her, about 
such things, how to wade in the pretty little brook. And later, 
with this same grave simplicity, he tells his king what he thinks 
of his course of action. He is perfectly respectful, but he shows 
clearly that he feels himself entirely the king's equal. Alto- 
gether the play itself and its presentation are thoroughly de- 
lightful. 

Some Facts of General College Interest. 

A meeting was held recently at Elmira in honor of Rev. 
Augustus W. Cowles, President Emeritus, and one of the found- 
ers of Elmira College, which was the pioneer institution for the 
higher education of women. Elmira was chartered in 185 1, and 
it was a visit to the new college, and a talk with Dr. Cowles, 
which led to the founding of Vassar. The fiftieth anniversary 
of the establishment of Elmira will be celebrated in 1905, when 
Wellesley will be just thirty years old. 

Columbia this month enters a new field in the publication of 
undergraduate papers, with the appearance of the "Columbia 
Monthly," a representative magazine which shall appeal to all 
classes of Columbia men, students, alumni, faculty, and friends 
of the university. In addition to literary essays, short stories, 
poems, etc., the new magazine will contain special articles by and 
about prominent Columbia men. 



STICKNEY & SMITH, 

1S7 Tremont Street, Boston, 

Allow tO per cent, discount to 
Teachers and Pupils of Welles- 
ley College on 

Ladies' Costumes, 
Street, Walking Suits, 
Skirts and Garments 

of All Kinds, 

Waists and Furs, 

(OUR ONLY STORE.) 



Framing, Glass and all Passepartout Materials. 
Mounts and tinted papers in sheets and cut to 
size. Enlarging and Locket Photos. ^ <£ jt jt 

G. L. Abell, Photographer 

WELLESLEY, iVtASS. 

Theatrical Wigs and MaRe-up, 
M. G. SLATTERY, 

22G Tremont Street, Boston. 

Near Touraine, Opp. Majestic Theatre. 
WIGS, BEARDS, CURLS, To rent for Private Theatricals 

MOUSTACHES, Masquerades, Carnivals. 

Grease Paints, Eye Pencils, Powders, Rouges, Etc. 



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horses. Fifteen minutes from Park Square, 

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COLLEGE NEWS 



KNEISEL QUARTET CONCERT. 

The concert by the Kneisel Quartet on Monday night, Feb- 
ruary 8, was undoubtedly the greatest musical event of our 
College year. It was not because the Kneisel Quartet has a 
well-known reputation that our enthusiasm rose so high; it was 
the recognition of great playing, on the part of the large audi- 
dience. The Kneisel Quartet is remarkable for its ensemble 
work — chords are actually chords and not isolated notes played 
on different instruments at the same time, and one feels the in- 
fluence of one ruling mind. Mr. Kneisel' s, in all phrasing and tone- 
coloring for there is nothing unbalanced or inconsistent in any 
way. Mr. Schroder's 'cello solo, a lento from Chopin, was par- 
ticularly enjoyable for the beautiful tone, and for the emotion, 
which was naturally not so repressed as in the quartets. But the 
finest number on the program was the Beethoven quartet in 
which the intellectuality and greatness of Mr. Kneisel's musical 
conceptions were at their highest point. 

Program. 
I Quartet in B flat Major Beethoven 

II. Solo for violoncello: Lento Chopin 

(With string accompaniment). 

III. Quartet in F Major Tschaikowsky 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION NOTES. 



Last Thursday evening Miss Rose Johnson told us a little 
about her work in Egypt, which was so interesting that we were 
sorry when she was obliged to stop for the close of the meeting. 
Miss Johnson is head of the Christian Association work at Alex- 
andria, where the work is extended in many unexpected direc- 
tions. Besides furnishing a home for young women and con- 
ducting classes, the Association finds employment for the 
women, teaches trades in its workrooms, cares for children, and 
meets steamers and trains to look after and direct any homeless 
or destitute wanderers. But the hinds supplied are very mea- 
ger and Miss J ohnson herself is forced to undergo extreme hard- 
ship and discomfort. She told of having just given up $25 of her 
own, which she had intended to invest in books, in order to help 
raise a needed fund. Here is an opportunity for each of us to 
exercise a little self-denial. Both books and money are being 
collected for Miss Johnson. We can contribute books at any 
rate: each one can spare at least one good book from her many. 
See the class bulletin boards for directions, and let each girl con- 
tribute. 

SOCIETY NOTES 



The Monthly Program Meeting of Society Zeta Alpha was 
held in the Society House. Wednesday evening, February 10. 
The following program was presented : 

Life of Thackeray Olive Smith 

Thackeray as a Novelist Ruth Lyon 

Thackeray's Cynicism Flora Humphrey 

A Comparison of Thackeray's Work with that of 

Dickens Eleanor Munroe 



A program Meeting of the Phi Sigma Fraternity was held in the 

the Society House, Wednesday evening, February 10. 

Subject: The Period of the Poetic Drama, illustrated by Stephen 

Phillips. 

A Summary of Herod, with readings Alice Ames 

The Story of Ulysses Jane Lennox 

Readings. 

Penelope Helen Segar 

Ulysses Helen Schermerhorn 

Calypso Bess Sooy 

The Story of Paola and Francesca Alice Ames 

Readings. 

Francesca Claire Sampson 

Paola Esther Lape 

Giovanni Maria Dowd 

Lucrezia Edith Ball 



Board for the Easter Vacation 
at the Wellesley Inn, $7.00 to 
$9.00 per week. Apply as soon 
as possible. 



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WAISTS of Jap and Wash Silks, Crepe de 
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Berkeley and Boylston Streets. 
Modern in Every Detail. 

Restaurant for Ladies. Entrance on Boylston Street. 
JOHN A. SHERLOCK. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



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PICTURES FRAMED 

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Mrs. H. E. Currier's 

Grove Street, Wellesley. 

Edward E. Henry, D.M.D. 

(Grad. Harvard Univ. Dental School) 

Shattuck's Block, . Wellesley. 
Hours 9-13 and 2-5- 

SMITH BROTHERS, 

Butter, Cheese & Eggs, 

2 and 4 New Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON, MAS5. 

Sole Receivers of Randolph Cream- 
ery^ 

MARY L. MORAN, 
DressmaHir??, 

Shaw Building, Wellesley, Mass. 
latest pa&tyionj, 

GEO. P. RAYMOND CO. 

Costume Parlors, 

2 Boylston Place, Boston 

Costumes lor private theatricals 
and Costume parties. 

John A Morgan 8t Co. 

PHARMACISTS, 

Shattuck Building, Wellesley, Mass. 



"Tom" Griffin, und w e e n ll s e t s l ev 

Carriages at Station on arrival of all trains. 

Reliable Horses and Carriages To Let. 

Personal Attention to all orders 
for evening trains. Order box at 
North Door of College Hall. 

BAGGAGE IBAK6FKHHEB. 
TELEPHONE 101-8. 

H. L. LAWRENCE CO. 

Poultry, Wild Game, 

Stalls 46 & 48 Faneuil Hall 

Market, 

BOSTON. 

F. DIEHL & SON, 

Dealers in 

Coal, Wood, Hay & Grain, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Ttlephone No. 16- 



THE PARLIAMENT OF FOOLS. 



THE SNOB THAT WENT HER OWN WAY. 

Hear, and attend, and listen, O Best Beloved, for this befell 
and behappened and became and was when the improved girls 
were fresh. The Grind was fresh, and the Freak was fresh, and 
the Beauty was fresh, and the Shark was fresh; as fresh as fresh 
could be. Of course the Nice Ordinary Freshman was fresh too; 
she didn't even begin to be improved till she met the Sopho- 
more Room-mate, who said she didn't like living in those fresh 
ways. She put up a Countess Potocka instead of the fish-net, 
and she set a shiny chafing-dish on the tea-table; and she hung 
a neat curtain in front of the book-case; and she said: 

"Chuck your dirty dishes and your math books behind the 
curtain when you come in, Child, and now we'll have an aesthetic 
room. 

"That evening, Best Beloved, the N. O. F. took her room- 
mate's chafing-dish, and her own sugar, and her next-door 
neighbor's chocolate and condensed milk, and she lighted the 
'stravagant pure alcohol, and she made a magic; the first fudge 
magic in her college career. But in the long, dark, corridor all 
the fresh Freshmen smelt the smell of the sweet, rich fudge, and 
the Beauty said: 

" I will go and call on the girl in No. 10; Sally Snobley, come 
with me." 

"No," said the Snob, who was the freshest of all the fresh 
freshmen, " I am the girl who goes her own way, and all girls are 
not alike to me. I will not come." 

"She and I can never be friends," said the Beauty to herself, 
and she went and knocked at the door and said: "What do we 
have in math?" 

"O, my Fellow-Shirker," said the N. O. F.. "who cares? Have 
some fudge." So they spent the evening together quite comfy, 
and agreed to spend their Saturday evenings together for al- 
ways, and always, and always. 

"Beauty is a clever girl," said Snob to herself, meanwhile, 
"but she is not so clever as I am." But one night she saw the 
Sophomore Room-mate go into No. 10 with the Sophomore 
President. Then Snob went to the door and asked the N. O. F. 
for a Kent I. The N. O. F. introduced her to Sophomore 
Room-mate and Sophomore President. The Shark and the 
Freak, and the Grind and the Athlete were all there calling on 
the N. O. F , but the Snob was not asked to stop. 

"That is the freshest freshman I've seen," said Sophomore 
Room-mate. "If you'd been cordial to her she would have 
stayed." 

" I never shall be," said N. O. F., "but if I am I suppose she 
will come here for always, and always, and always." Sure 
enough, a few nights later Snob came back to return the Kent I, 
and brought a box of chocolates with her; and when Sophomore 
Room-mate came in at 9.45, lo and behold, there sat Snob 
quite comfy beside the tea-table. 

"You have been cordial to her," said Room-mate to N. O. F., 
after Snob was gone. " But I wasn't cordial to her, and I won't 
be. Whenever I meet her I shall say: How do you do, Miss 
Snobley,' most sniffily and most snobbish, and I shall never 
invite her here." 

And from that day to this, Best Beloved, Sophomore, when she 
meets Snob, says, "How do you do?" most sniffily and most 
snobbish. Snob is often nice "to N. O. F., and to other people. 
But between times, and when she has had a good crit. on her 
theme, she walks along the narrow board walks, or the long dark, 
corridors, tossing her snobbish head, and walking by her snob- 
bish lone. 

Those wishing entertainment at 
the INN for their guests during 
the GLEE CLUB CONCERT 
Season, should make arrangements 
for the same by February 18. The 
management plans to cater to a lim- 
ited number at the usual rates. 



P. H. PORTER, 

Plumber. 

TIN AND SHEET IRON WORK 

fjot TOttater an6 Steam Wearers, 
Stealer In Stoves, IRanges, Waroware, 
paints, Oils, Etc. 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Established 1876. 

Chas. E. Shattuck, 
GROCER, 

Well«sley Square. 

Qassius ffl. Jtell, 

Successor to A. B. Clark, 

THE GROCER, 

Washington St., Wellesley. 

B. S. COLE, 

Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Poultry 

and Game, 

Wholesale and Retail. 

Stalls 13 & 15 Faneuil Hall Market 

Tel. Connection. BOSTON 

F. A. Coolidge & Co., 

Dealers In 

Choice Meats & Provisions 

Washington St., Wellesley. 



J. TAILBY & SON, 
FLORISTS, 

Wellesley, Opp. R. R. Station 

Orders by mail or otherwise 
promptly attended to. Con- 
nected by Telephone. 

HOLDEN'S STUDIO 

20 No. Ave., Natick, 

HIGH GRADE PORTRAITS. 

Connected by Telephone. 

R. F. EVANS, 

Painter and Decorator. 

Paper Hanging; and Tinting;. 
HU flDail ©rocrs promptly attenoeo to. 

P. O. BOX 66. 

548 Washington Street, Wellesley 

The Attention 

that we give to details is the secret 
of our superior work. May we have 
a trial package from you? 

People's Steam Laundry, 

INatlck, .Muss. 

F. L. Cupples, Prop. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ALUM NA N OTES. 

In "The Dial" for November i, 1903, there is a review of Dr. 
Sophonisba Breckenridge's (1888) work "Legal Tender," in 
an article by M B. Hammond on Recent Discussions in Private 
and Public Finance." Her conclusions in regard to paper 
issues are supported by Professor Dewey, but her position in the 
legal tender quality of silver is opposed by Professor Laughlin. 
The latter, however, concurs emphatically with her views on the 
legality of the Legal Tender Acts of Congress during the Civil 
War; while Professor Dewey and the final decision of the Su- 
preme Court are against her in this point. 

Miss Anna M Olsson, 1890, is one of the first women to be 
principal of a public school in Brooklyn, New York. She is in 
charge of Public School 141 at McKibben, Leonard and Boerum 
streets. There are fifty-two classes from kindergarten to ninth 
grade, and the children are, with few exceptions, Russian Jews. 
The program for their graduating exercises on January 30 was 
most interesting, and showed that in spite of foreign names and 
ways they are being trained in the ideals and duties of American 
citizenship. 

Miss Mary Lmogene Hazeltine, 1891, is Head Librarian at the 
James Prendergast Free Library at Jamestown, New York, a 
position that has given her a wide opportunity for enlarging the 
usefulness of the library, and has brought her into permanent 
and important relations with the library interests throughout 
the State. Miss Hazeltine believes heartily in the public library 
movement, and is greatly interested in bringing the library into 
its proper place in the community life. She is resident director 
of the Chautauqua Library School and has spoken in behalf of the 
public library before audiences of teachers, students and 
mothers, and at the annual banquet of the New York City Li_ 
brary Club. 

Miss Ruby P. Bridgman, 1894, spent part of December in New 
York, and was present at the first performance of "Parsifal" on 
the twenty-fourth. Since her return she has given an interest- 
ing talk on the opera before the Inasmuch Circle of King's 
Daughters and their friends in Hyde Park, Massachusetts. 

The address of Mrs. Katharine Connor Fisher, 1895, is The 
Mendota, Washington, D. C. 

Miss Grace M Chapin, 1898. is teaching in Monroe, Michig2n. 

Miss Ella Weld Green, 1(899, * s cataloguer and reference libra- 
rian at the James Prendergast Free Library in Jamestown, New 
York. 

The address of Mrs. Alice Dana Knox Stanley, 1900, is 311 
West 94th street, New York City. 

Miss Florence E. Bailey, 1900, is acting as substitute in the 
Brockton. Massachusetts, High School. 

Miss Mathilde von Beyersdorff, 1900, is at home at 49 Water- 
man street. Providence. Rhode Island. All mail should be ad- 
dressed there instead of to her European address. 

Miss Frances Lathrop, 190 1, accompanied by her father, 
sailed for Japan in November. At present they are in Cairo, 
Egypt, and will return by the Mediterranean route. 

Miss Nan Henning, 1902, is in Los Angeles, California, the 
guest of Miss Annis Van Nuys, 1903. 

ENG AGEM ENTS. 

Miss Elva Hubbard, Young, 1896, to Mr. Charles Thorne Van 
Winkle of Silverton, Colorado. 

Miss Myrtle Brotherton, 1896, to Mr. Theodore Criley. 

births! 

October 1, 1903, a son, Leslie, to Mrs. Bessie Pierce Needham, 
1896. 

August 28, 1903, a daughter to Mrs. Cornelia Janssen Burt, 
1896. 

January 2, 1904, a second son, Frank Tyler Carlton, Jr., to 
Mrs. Blanche Whitlock Carlton, 1893. 

D EATH S. 

In Boston, January 29, 1904, George B. Barrows, father of 
Mary Barrows, 1890. 



Perhaps you've heard of Hatch's store? 
It's right on Summer street 

Perhaps you've heard of Hatch's store? 
You'll surely never find a more 
Complete assortment of all Oriental 
things to eat. 

Perhaps you've heard of Hatch's store ? 

It's right on Summer street. 
Remember 

HATCH'S, 

43 anb 45 Summer St., ffioston. 



Mr. John Forsythe, 



-OF 



865 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

Has the honor to announce that on 

FRIDAY, February 19th, 

SATURDAY, February 20th, 

He will display the New Styles in 

WAISTS, NECKWEAR, GLOVES, ETC, 

For the Spring and Summer Seasons, 1904, at 

The Welle<sley Inn, 

Wellesley, Mass. 
You are cordially requested to call and inspect 
his suburb assortment. 

For the Land of the Mid- 
night Lunch, 

nothing can equal 

Underwood's Original Deviled Ham 

Made from sugar-cured 
ham and fine, pure 
spices. Delicious 
for sandwiches, at 
lunch, picnic, or tea, 
and in the chafing 
dish. 

It may be bought at 
any good grocers, 
but be sure you see 
on the can THE 
LITTLE RED 
DEVIL. 

book contains a lot of unique and practical receipts. We will 
free. WM. UNDERWOOD & CO., Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 




Our 
send it 



COLLEGE NEWS 



NOTICE. 



The Legenda Board of 1S06. desiring to foster an interest in 
English composition, and believing the best stories and plays by 
undergraduates are yet to be written, oners prizes to under- 
graduate? for work (plays or short stories') . which shall be deemed 
n excellence by 'he Boan*. of JucL 

The manuscri; ts are to be passed in May 20. 1004. There is 
no limit of lengtV One priz-- shall be awarded t' a Treshman. 
the other to an uppei class student. The amount to be awarded 
in prizes is fifty dollars 

The Board of Judges ~<ociate Professor Hart. 

Chairman; Professor Baldwin of Yale. Professor Baker of Har- 
vard. Miss Shackford and Miss Vireinia Sherwood, of the C! 
1S96. 

The editorial board of the Wellesley Magazine and News 
wish to call particular attention to the above notice. That it is 
felt that Wellesley's best literary work is yet to be done, cer- 
tainly should be a spur to the members of every class Literary 
ability in the college there certainly is. and this is the time for it 
to show itself. A failure to respond to this offer of the Class of 
1S96. would show a lack of earnest college interest and purpose, 
most deplorable by its immediate contrast. A response means 
not only individual interest, but a representation of the C< 
an evidence of a standard of literary ability and public spirit 
that materially affects our standing among other colk . 

Miss Bates gratefully acknowledges the following conribu- 
tions toward the freight bill ($17,901, for the books sent by Col- 
lege generosity to the colony of cunsumptives at Phoenix. The 
-hort. but eloquent. 

Professor Merrill Fifteen Stamps 

Anonymous Silver quarter 

Professor Macdougall Dollar bill 

Mis May Frazer Smith < ) ne half dollar 

Mrs. Caroline M. Bates of Wellesley Hills Ten dollar check 

Miss Katharine Bates of Wellesley Hills Xir imps 

Professor Calkins S . amps 

Total. < 14.21 

The College News may have to discuss a surplus \ 

LITERARY NOTE. 



Mrs Durant has lately had pul 

which was delivered in the Mercantile Librarv Lecture 
Course by Mr. Durant in Tremont Temple, during the vear 
This address had for its purpose the bringing to the hearts and 
minds of Americans a man whose pioneer work in the cav 
liberty has received all too little attention and mention. The 
essay is valuable from an historic and from a literary stand- 
point, giving as it does an accurate picture of those troublous 
times before the Revolution and bearing the stamp of the careful 
man of letters. 

THEATRICAL NOTES. 



Colonial Theatre. — "Three Little Mai 

Hollis Street Theatre. — Maude Adams in ' The Prettv - 

of Jose." 
Park Theatre — William Collins in "The Dictator." 
Globe Theatre. — "The Burgoma- 



H E R R I C K'S, 

COPLEY SQUARE, SF.AR BACK BAY POST-OFFICE, 

BEST TICKETS FOR ALL THE THEATRES. 

Phone now 3329, 2330 and 2331 - 



THE BAILEY, BANKS & 
B1DDLE COHPANY, 

Designers and Manufacturers of 
Class Pins Badges 

Stick: Pins Class Rings 

Class Stationery 

Designs and estimates of cost mailed on request. Xo obigaltion 
is incurred. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Chickerino- Pianos 

ct 

The OLDEST in AMERICA : 
THE BEST in the WORLD 

WRITE FOR CATALOG I' B 

Chickering ^f Sons 

PIANOFORTE MAKERS 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Cloaks 



G. Wlil^ SMjJH 



Furs 



C jUR Government Forecaster looks for an early 
^-^ Spring and a warm Summer. Beyond 
shadow of a doubt these predictions may be 
right. We are ready to show the Early Spring 
Styles in Ladies' Coats. Broadcloth. Coverts, 
Mixtures and Cheviots $15 upwards. Fine Tail- 
ored Suits $25 upwards. Walking Skirts in Mix- 
tures and Broadcloths $10.50 upward. Dress 
Skirts in Voile and Canvas, silk lined, $25 upward. 
Cravanette Rain Coats, Linen Shirt Waists made 
expressly for us. New ideas in Silk Waists, 
Washable Neckwear, Handmade Collar and Cuff 
Sets, etc., etc. Some of the best values we ever 
offered. See our Smart Herring Bone Covert 
Cloth Coats, silk lined throughout, at 



$15 



Made by the original 
Fifth Avenue Tailor 



10 per cent. 

to 
STUDENTS 

and 
FACULTY. 



Special Orders takeii 
wMhout pxtra charge, 
from 3* to 44 bust. Refit- 
ting without extra 
charge. 

Easter comes early. 

Place your orders now. 



I Suits 



158 Tremont St. 



Waists 



This space reserved for 
PARTRIDGE 
Class Photographer, 1904